The hard journey of the Berivans on horseback



The hard journey of the Berivans on horseback

Berivans, who spend most of their lives looking after animals in Muş, travel for miles on horseback every day to milk their sheep.

Most of the lives of the berivans living in the rural areas of Muş and earning their living by husbandry are spent on horseback.
The beryvans, who travel on horseback to the pastures where the herds are located in Karaköy of the Varto district, can hardly cross the 8-kilometer difficult road.
The women, who pour the milk they have obtained by milking their animals in the pasture, into the bins and load them by helping the horses, are on the way to the village again.
The berivans who reach the village make butter, cheese and yoghurt from the milk they obtain and sell them.
Aydan Bingöl, one of the beryvans, who stated that they traveled 4 kilometers on horseback to be able to travel to the pasture every day, said that after milking the animals, they went back to the village again.
Stating that they make cheese, yoghurt and butter from the milk they obtain, Bingöl said, “Since this is our livelihood, we have to work. Life conditions are difficult and our children go to school, we have to do our job. We are engaged in animal husbandry for our livelihood. Now we will take the milk and use it for winter preparation.”
Reminding that he was a benefactor in his own village before getting married, Bingöl said, “I came here and I have been here for 25 years. For 30 years, I have been coming and going to milking on horseback. We ebb and flow for milking starting in the spring until autumn. We are always on horseback. We are under the snow all the time during the winter, and we spend time with the animals that give birth and look after the babies of animals. Our lives are always spent with animals. It’s a very difficult job. Despite everything, we will work because it is our livelihood.”
Sabriye Tekin, one of the beryvans who stated that they live in Karaköy and that they reach the pasture by crossing kilometers every day, said, “Since our herds are in the mountainous region, we milk our milk and return home with horses. We take our milk home and pour it into the machine. With the help of churn, we get butter, and we get precipitate on the fire. I milk the sheep and get at least 20-30 kilograms of milk. When we’re done, we sit down with the women, drink tea and chat. After our rest, we get on horseback and go to our homes together. We can only milk our sheep and make a living like this,” he said.


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