Stories of escape to nature: They enjoy an isolated life in the highland they are settled in.



Stories of escape to nature: They enjoy an isolated life in the highland they are settled in.

Citizens who abandoned their city life and created a new life for themselves in the Pürenli, Balıklı, Sinekli, Derebalık and Hera plateaus, which host pine forests and lakes of Düzce and where the sounds of water and birds are mixed with each other, are also living the plateau tradition that remained from their grandfathers.

During the Corona virus (Covid-19) epidemic, citizens who settled in the highlands of Düzce at an altitude of 1600 to 1900 meters enjoy being in touch with nature away from the crowd with their new lifestyle.
Citizens who want to stay away from the crowded environments in city life due to the epidemic took their breath in Pürenli, Balıklı, Sinekli, Derebalık and Hera plateaus, where pine forests and lakes are mixed with water and bird sounds. Citizens, who choose an isolated life for themselves and mostly deal with animal husbandry, live the transhumance tradition, which was left from their grandfather.
Metin Cebecioğlu, who worked as a tradesman in Gebze district of Kocaeli in the past, said that when the epidemic started due to his chronic illness, he was isolated in the house belonging to his grandfather in the 1900-altitude Kardüz Plateau in Gölyaka district.
Emphasizing that masks, distance and cleanliness are the most important rules during the epidemic process, Cebecioğlu noted that an isolated environment is offered in the plateaus. Cebecioğlu stated that he spent his days without getting bored despite the silence and calmness in the plateaus and said, “We broke our wood early because it was Ramadan. I burn our stove, I prepare iftar dinner for the evening. The day is ending quickly. I enjoy nature. I abstracted myself from the city life. he spoke.
Cafer Yılmaz, 79, who grew up with a plateau-winter culture culture, said that he spent the epidemic process in Sinekli Plateau at 1600 altitude in Kaynaşlı district. Stating that he felt comfortable on the plateau, Yılmaz said, “Since my childhood, I have been coming here 7 months a year. This year I am here without ever going”.
Perihan Yılmaz noted that they are used to plateau life and that they spent all of their time here during the epidemic process. Expressing his satisfaction with being intertwined with nature, Yılmaz said, “Is it like a plateau city? Everything is natural here. We do not know what the disease is. We do not have the fear of corona virus.
Cemal Dinçer, 54, who lives in Banaz district of Uşak, collects the garbage in the forest by walking an average of 5 kilometers every day with his goat named “Karakız”. Cemal Dinçer, who worked as a butcher in various supermarkets in Izmir, bought land in his hometown Banaz after his retirement in 2015 and settled in the prefabricated house he built.
Dinçer, who takes walks in the forest area near his house with his goat named “Karakız”, which he bought for him to befriend him, started collecting these wastes a year ago when he saw that there was garbage everywhere.
Dinçer, who took it as his duty after a while, cleans mountain-hill every morning with “Karakız” and a handcar.
Dinçer collects the garbage thrown into the forest by walking about 5 kilometers a day and empties the wheelbarrow he filled in 2-3 hours.
Cemal Dinçer said that he had been collecting garbage every day for a year, but could not clean it all because the forests around him continued to be polluted.
Dinçer explained that he took out 1-2 sacks of garbage a day and said: “I have collected more than 3 tons of garbage so far. I have been doing sports and cleaning my forest. It is very good for me. I will continue as long as my health allows. Those who come to the picnic do not collect their garbage. Everyone is throwing away their garbage. After eating and drinking, collect your garbage and throw it away. This is not something I can do alone. Our forests are our national wealth. It is our duty to protect them and keep them clean.
Stating that he trained his goat like a pet and that he could walk a long way thanks to his friendship, Dinçer said, “I feel like I have a person next to me, he gives me peace.”
Mehmet Kuş (35), who left the city life when he was adversely affected by the pandemic while running a cafe in Ankara, settled in the house near the sea from his father in Yayladağı district of Hatay. Explaining that being alone with nature gives him peace of mind, Kuş said that he earned a living with the 2 thousand liras he earned a week by fishing and that he sometimes met his food needs with fish exchange.
Mehmet Kuş, who has been operating cafes and restaurants in Ankara for 10 years, returned to his hometown Yayladağı district of Hatay due to the stagnation in his business during the pandemic. Kuş, who settled in a two-room house inherited from his father in Gözlüce District, which is close to the sea, started to live a natural life by fishing with spear while exploring the region with eastern walks.
Expressing that he had stressful days with the pandemic, Kuş said, “Due to the pandemic, when things went bad, we were overwhelmed, we were stressed, we were affected financially and spiritually. I wanted to get away from all these and therefore I returned to my hometown. We have a small, two-room house left from my father. I decided to stay alone by the sea and live naturally. I never tried to save money before, I saw that my life is going away from my life. “That’s why I decided to give myself to the sea. I come here every day, I dive when the weather conditions are right. I fish in the morning and evening and I make a living from it,” he said.
Saying that he did not pay for many things in his new life, Kuş said, “I sell some of the fish that I shoot with a harpoon and catch with a fishing line, and meet my needs. Sometimes I exchange the fish I catch with the shepherds while supplying food. I buy butter, salted yogurt, cheese, cottage cheese from them. I use spring water, I already buy the bread from the tandoor. While I buy the bread, I go to the villages near here and exchange the fish from the sisters in the tandoori for bread. I give the fisherman fish and buy ice in the same way to keep the fish I catch. “When my harpoons and similar materials are missing, I go to the city once a month.”
Saying that he loves the dark very much and spends a lot of time to rest, Kuş said that he set up tents in the caves in the bays of Kel Mountain where he can fish and said, “When the sea conditions are good, I also take my tent and come here. When there is no fish, I sometimes stay in the tent for two days. But when I catch fish, I have to go home so that it doesn’t smell because I can’t keep it here. Then I take supplements and come back to these bays. Sometimes there are times when I can’t fish for three days, I stay here for three days. Because I have no other job. At night, I throw my fishing rod to the seaside, saying ‘rather than wait on the shore, let it wait in the sea’. Surprise fish come out in the morning hours, ”he said.
Expressing that he earns 2 thousand TL per week by fishing, Kuş said: “I fish satisfactorily. I know where to go because of my talent and I have a command of the region. I also give the fish I catch for serious money. Because it is fresh and natural, There are those who order specially. There are even those who order live fish in the sea. I catch 50-60 kilos of fish weekly and sell them for different prices “
Expressing that the peace of the sea and nature is unexplainably good, but the only thing disturbing in the region is pollution, Kuş said, “There is only one situation that I am uncomfortable with; and that is when people leave their garbage when they come to the sea, picnic, fishing. This is a very serious problem and the beach is full of boxes and plastic waste. In my spare time, sometimes when the sea is not suitable for diving, I collect the garbage that people throw away ”.


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